Sunday, January 11, 2009

Life at Gunrock

Living at our home in Gunrock consists of sharing our habitat with multiple species. The most fascinating one of late is a family consisting of a mother dog and her 10 puppies. The mother is a regular old shade of tan - like the millions of Jujus and Tommys that populate the streets of Hyderabad, scavenging for food in garbage disposal areas - amply situated at every street corner. Her puppies are, however, an interesting mix of brown, tan and black. My favorite is a suede color puppy with a black nose and face, the opposite of the puppy below.

From My life

Just a few minutes before we took this picture, five of the puppies stood in a row and returned our barks woof for woof.


From My life

The sun obligingly posing for a picture.

From My life

Some of our neighbors decided to kill two birds with one stone: one can almost hear them say, "Instead of constructing a sewage tank to prevent backflow of sewage water into the home plumbing, let's just drain all our sewage in an empty plot and allow the buffaloes and pigs passing by to take a bath." Below is the buffalo clan.

From My life


From My life

What remains of the rural landscapes that once characterized our colony: the trees that survived the onslaught of urbanization have spread their canopy generously.

From My life

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

The puppies recognize me only in the black sweater!!!

Should have got a picture of the puppy-crow encounter!

Joji

Anonymous said...

One thing can be said about land in India- it is rarely a waste, considering all the innumerable obvious uses!!!

Giti said...

What a fun post! Enjoyed the photos. And loved the bit about the Jujus and Tommys. And the one about the puppies returning your barks woof for woof. Too cute.

Anonymous said...

Puppies galore, in our backyard no more...what with those noisy pigs and prowling snakes! But there is always new life to look out for in such a biodiversity hotspot!

Anonymous said...

Puppies galore, in our backyard no more...what with those noisy pigs and prowling snakes! But there is always new life to look out for in such a biodiversity hotspot!